Adidas Taking Kicks After Horribly Insensitive Boston Marathon Emails

Adidas Sends Out Unintentionally Brutal Emails To Boston Marathon Participants

Tuesday morning, Adidas was a shoe company known for making products used to kick stuff around. But by Wednesday morning, Adidas will be known as the shoe company that managed to kick itself in its own backside.

On Tuesday, the renowned German shoe and apparel company sent out emails to 2,017 athletes who completed the Boston Marathon. The subject line they chose for said email? “Congrats, you survived the Boston Marathon!”

The email was obviously meant to congratulate the participants in the grueling foot race. But whoever wrote that message apparently didn’t take into consideration the 2013 Boston Marathon terror attack which claimed three lives and injured more than 260 people.

It didn’t take long for folks on Twitter to spot Adidas’ screw-up:

Adidas was quick to issue an apology for their insensitive comment in the hours following the email’s release:

“We are incredibly sorry. Clearly, there was no thought given to the insensitive email subject line we sent Tuesday. We deeply apologize for our mistake.

The Boston Marathon is one of the most inspiration sporting events in the world. Every year we’re reminded of the hope and resiliency of the running community at this event.”

 

Adidas’ terrible email gaffe almost seems like a “hold my beer!” moment in the wake of two recent high-profile PR nightmares at other major corporations: Pepsi’s ridiculous advertising blunder, which was followed shortly by United Airlines’ decision to physically, violently remove a passenger from an airplane to make space for their own staff. But at least Adidas immediately apologized for their mistake. And unlike the story involving United, nobody was physically hurt in this instance.

So far, April hasn’t been a great month to work in public relations at major corporations; It almost makes you wonder what other stories are going to pop up in in the news in the next week or so. Corporations in America might want to spend that time practicing their eggshell-walking techniques.

Featured image courtesy of Jim Rogash/ Getty Images

Matt Terzi is a political satirist and essayist from Binghamton, New York, who has written for some of the most prominent satire publications in the country. He's now moving into more "serious" subject matter, without losing touch with his comedic roots