Sales Of Orwell’s Dystopian Classic Spike After KellyAnne Conway’s ‘Alternative Facts’ Comment (VIDEO)

During Sunday’s Meet The Press, KellyAnne Conway, “counselor” to President Donald Trump introduced a new phrase that almost instantaneously caused sales of George Orwell’s dystopian novel 1984 to spike, The Guardian reports.

KellyAnne Conway spins falsehoods and facts

The phrase, which is now trending all over the place? “Alternative facts.”

Conway referred to claims made by White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer, whose claims, it turns out, are easily disproved. Spicer had incorrectly claimed that last week’s inauguration “attracted the largest audience ever.”

When Todd questioned her about Spicer’s remarks, she called them “alternative facts,” The Washington Post reports.

An incredulous look passed over Todd’s face and he responded:

“Alternative facts are not facts. They are falsehoods.”

 

And for many people, once they heard that, visions of Orwell’s book floated through their minds. Many drew comparisons between “alternative facts” and “newspeak” — a term used in the novel to signify a fictional language that was meant to eliminate personal thought. Some perhaps thought of the word “doublethink,” another term Orwell coined.

“The Party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears. It was their final, most essential command,” and other quotes from the book likely resonated with readers.

The connection was first made by Washington Post reporter Karen Tumulty on CNN’s Reliable Sources. “Alternative facts is a George Orwell phrase,” she noted.

And since then, Conway’s interview has been quite the topic on Twitter, even prompting Merriam Webster to chime in:

Twitter users are having a field day with Conway right now.

The Post reported that by early Wednesday morning,1984 topped Amazon’s best-seller list.

Related: Watch CNN Host Relentlessly Grill Trump Apologist Kellyanne Conway In Brutal Hacking Throwdown

“We put through a 75,000 copy reprint this week. That is a substantial reprint and larger than our typical reprint for ‘1984,’” a spokesman for Penguin Books told the Post.

NBC reports that sales of other books with similarly sinister messages were up as well — including Sinclair Lewis’ novel “It Can’t Happen Here,” about the election of a fascist president, which was at number 46. Aldous Huxley’s “Brave New World” was at 71.

And even here, Twitter users didn’t fail to connect the dots.

And Seth Myers couldn’t resist zinging Conway either:

“KellyAnne Conway is like someone trying to do a Jedi mind trick after only a week of Jedi training.”

1984 is a high school mainstay, and the fact that its sales are spiking this week speaks of the distrust many Americans feel with the rise of the Trump administration, and this is particularly fitting since the book is a story about an all-seeing and corrupt government. Its protagonist is Winston Smith, an average man living in a society that is compromised by a totalitarian government that distorts the truth, erases and destructs evidence of the past and controls all of its subjects. It’s the omniscient “Big Brother” in which the Ministry of Love is really the Ministry of Hate and virtually nothing is as it seems.

So it’s no wonder that the popularity of this most remarkable book is now off the charts.

Featured image via Gage Skidmore-Flickr  and Wikimidia Commons

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Megan was born and raised in Ventura, California. She has since lived in the San Francisco Bay Area, the Pacific Northwest, Arizona, Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida, Mexico, and Costa Rica. While she has always been a liberal, her travels have informed her politics. She has worked for more than 25 years as a professional journalist writing about crime, the police, local politics, feature stories, environmental issues and a variety of other topics. She now writes for Reverb Press.Megan supports Black Lives Matter and fights against racism, sexism, the corporatocracy, climate change deniers and others who continue to destroy the planet.